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Why buy Canadian ETFs if they are consistently outperformed by US ETFs?

I'm curious about whether Canadian ETFs are worthwhile, as they have been a constant drag on my returns for the past 5 years. I consider the S&P 500 to be the benchmark for any stock returns. It feels like Canadian ETFs will crash every time the S&P 500 does, but we will never rise to new all time highs the same way. The S&P TSX composite has roughly stagnated in the last 15 years, but the S&P 500 has shown substantial gains in that time (and in all of its history).
It is true that past results should not be used to justify future returns, and that Canadian ETFs do have some advantages. Off the top of my head:
  1. No need to pay a forex fee or do Norbert's Gambit
  2. Generally higher dividend payout ratios (helps with total returns)
  3. No 15% dividend withholding tax that US ETFs have
Would it be worthwhile to drop Canadian stocks altogether to chase higher potential returns? Some thoughts:
  1. Lesser geographical diversification
  2. Increased currency risk due to USD:CAD FX
  3. I prefer the assets of the S&P 500 over the S&P TSX. VCN has heavy exposure to banks, oil & gas, and Shopify, which wouldn't be my ideal investment focus at this time.
submitted by 4333mhz to PersonalFinanceCanada [link] [comments]

Switching institutions and investment strategies

I'm looking to get a little more tuned into investing. For the past several years I've been doing the Canadian Couch Potato strategy of e-series index funds with TD in both my RRSP and TFSA. Each of those accounts has about $30k in it, and I also have a LIRA with about $20k that is invested the same way. I recently moved my TFSA to Tangerine and put it in a savings account (partly to take advantage of a high-interest offer they had, but mostly because I'm planning on purchasing a detached home in the very near future and wanted to keep that money in cash). I already used $25k of my RRSP a few years ago for part of the downpayment on my current home, so the $30k I have in there now is really only going to be used for retirement. I also plan on making larger contributions to the RRSP going forward once I buy my next home (I've been skimping on my annual contributions recently to save for my next downpayment). Basically, that RRSP is going to get bigger (well...hopefully) and I will probably not be withdrawing that money for 30+ years until I retire, so I have a high tolerance for risk with that account. The TFSA is going to be emptied for the new house, but I'll probably build it back up slowly with low-moderate risk e-series index fund or ETF.
Lately I've been thinking of taking the RRSP out of TD and moving it to Questrade to dabble in ETFs and stocks. I know stocks aren't very highly recommended here, so maybe I'm just being naive. I was thinking of doing something like keeping half the RRSP (~$15k) in a high growth ETF like XGRO, and then the other half (~$15k) in US stocks that I can play around with...mostly for fun, but I'd be lying if I said I didn't have a couple friends who did pretty well with Tesla and other similar stocks recently and their enthusiasm about it is a bit infectious. As I contribute to the RRSP, I'll probably aim to keep that mix of half going to the ETF and half to stocks. I plan to keep all the stocks within my RRSP to avoid the withholding tax on US dividends, and also use Norbert's Gambit to avoid the forex fee on that initial conversion of $15k CAD to USD.
Additional context: I'm 31, married (dual income), make about $120k myself (I'm only investing my own money), no debt apart from mortgage, no kids (but could happen in the next couple years).
Am I crazy to do this? Should I just stick to index funds and / or ETFs? Maybe I'm being overzealous with the amount I want to potentially gamble away with stocks?
submitted by Superunknown_88 to PersonalFinanceCanada [link] [comments]

Is Norbert's Gambit not worth it for small amounts? + a question on having separate usd and cad trading accounts

Update: this will vary day to day but Norbert's Gambit looks worth it for values above $1700. Forex will probably be greater than $20. Below that, forex might be <$20. But that's a moving target.
I'm looking at buying some US ETFs (SHE, SPYX) to get my toes wet with investing. I'm using RBC Direct Investing. I only have 2K at the moment to play with and to me, it looks like converting this to USD in RBC is better than doing Norbert's Gambit which will cost me $20 in fees ($10 to buy, $10 to sell). But everyone is telling me to do Norbert's Gambit when exchanging funds between the US and Canada. Am I missing something?
Also, some guides say to have both a USD and a CAD trading accounts but my current TFSA DI account can have both USD and CAD funds. Should I have dedicated accounts for US and CAD trading or is just the one dual currency account ok?
submitted by SecureNarwhal to CanadianInvestor [link] [comments]

[Spain] Freaking out about my plan to FIRE

I'm a Canadian getting married to a Spaniard and we're planning to live in Spain to be close to her family.
Most of my savings are in CAD and USD and at current rates, they total around 1.5 Million EUR. At a 2% withdrawal rate that would give me around 30k EUyear which is probably enough to cover our cost of living.
I work remotely and can pull in 50-200k EUyear but given Spanish tax rates I'll probably be aiming to make less than <100k EUyear given how high the tax rates are for 60k EUR+. I'll consider it a "semi-FIRE" for the next few years. I still haven't decided whether to go SL or Autonomo but it doesn't seem like there is much difference between the two if I make around 100k EUR based on my calculations.
We don't have a house or plan to buy one right now as we love living internationally and will likely move somewhere new in 5-10 years.
Based on the above, I thought I was in good shape but the more I research Spanish tax rates (which must have evolved from the colonial methods of raping and pillaging all those who are not nobles) the more I'm freaking out about my tax and investment situation here.
  1. We'll live in Castilla y Leon and I understand the wealth tax kicks in at 700k Euros. Can my future wife and I share the allowance (i.e. 1.4 million Euros between the two of us?) or will I get hit for my savings over 700k unless I transfer half of my savings to her?
  2. I historically traded/invested through InteractiveBrokers with long-term passive strategies (Index funds). I'm now reading that USD/CAD ETFs are typically not available to Europeans due to EU laws. I'd rather keep my investments in a diverse mix of currencies - any recommendations on how to do that or the best low management fee ETFs in Europe?
  3. I've read on here that some types of investments can be reinvested in similar funds without being taxed on dividends/ETFs. Does anyone have a link or more information I can read on that? I'm definitely looking for tax-efficient strategies, both with respect to withholding taxes and taxes when I rebalance.
  4. How do ForEx savings/investments get converted for taxes? Is it the spot price on Dec. 31 or average in Q4 of the year or average over the entire year?
    I know a lot about investing and prefer to DIY but I really need to wrap my head around the tax situation here. There seems to be a ton of incorrect opinions and false information spread about and my lack of Spanish ability (I'm learning - but not conversant in technical stuff yet) doesn't help. My fiance and her family are pretty simple and don't seem to have a clue about the world of investing.
If anyone can recommend an English speaking tax lawyer / investment advisor who works on a reasonable fee basis that would be great too.
submitted by Baldpacker to EuropeFIRE [link] [comments]

Dollar Index and its impact on USDINR movement

Dollar Index and its impact on USDINR movement

image courtesy : pixabay
Many people in India who are just beginning their career in Currency Derivatives frequently hear about Dollar index. The social media and other platforms full of questions like “What is the Dollar Index?” and how it will impact the Indian currency pairs, especially the USDINR pair. This article will try to explain the US Dollar Index or USDX and its impact on the Indian currency pair.

What is the Dollar Index?

To put in simple words, it is the value of USD relative to the basket of major currency pairs. The value of the USDX tells the strength of the dollar. The six major currency pairs forming the basket along with weight are :
  1. EUR (57.6% )
  2. CHF (Swiss Franc -3.6%)
  3. YEN (Japanese yen — 13.6%)
  4. CAD (Canadian Dollar -9.1%)
  5. GBP(11.9% )
  6. SEK (Swedish Krona — 4.2%)
The USDX was created after the Bretton Woods agreement was dissolved in 1973. The base value was taken as 100, and the value of USDX is relative to the base value. The USDX is similar to the other indexes such as stock indices such as S&P 500, Nifty 50, where the weighted average of most valuable stocks is taken to form the stock index.
For calculation purpose, the exchange rates of six major currencies are taken with their respective weights in the index.
Prior to the establishment of USDX, all the major participating countries settled their balances in USD. The USD could be converted to Gold at $ 35/ounce. This led to the overvaluation of USD and the linked gold prices resulting in the temporary suspension of the gold standard. The countries then were free to choose the exchange rate, which did not depend on the price of the Gold and several countries freely floated their exchange rates. This led to a search for another standard, and thus, the dollar index was born.

Highs and lows in dollar index value

In 1973 the value of dollar index was set to 100. It reached its peak in 1985 where its value was around 165. In 2008 it hit the low of 70. If the value of the dollar index is above 100, then the dollar has appreciated against the basket of currencies. In contrast, any value below 100 or equivalent to 100 means dollar has depreciated against the basket of currencies. It can also be referred that the dollar is weak below 100 and strong above 100. There are several factors which impact the dollar index. These factors include macroeconomics, deflation/inflation of dollar and other currencies in the basket, etc.

Is US Dollar Index Traded?

Yes Dollar Index popularly known as USDX or DXY is available for trading on the US and other overseas exchanges, but not in Indian bourses.

Is USDX available for Investment?

Yes, it is also available indirectly for Investment via ETF and mutual fund routes in the US markets. At the moment, the Indian market doesn’t have any such products for investment purpose.

How dollar index impacts USDINR?

Indeed weakening and strengthening of dollar impacts USDINR movement. If take into consideration businesses and services where we deal in dollars only then strengthening of dollar increases the Forex reserve value. In contrast, the weakening of the dollar globally reduces the income of all the export-oriented industries. The reverse is true for import oriented industries in the country.
If you are a trader, then falling and rising dollar index provides you with the opportunities to trade in the USDINR pairs in both ways. You can either short when the dollar is weakening or go long when the dollar is strengthening. You can also hedge your position in the wake of weakening dollar through options and future trades. Corporate Business houses hedge their risk by hedging against any Dollar appreciation/depreciation based on the index value.
But the movement of USDINR pair should not be solely analyzed merely on the movement of the dollar index, and other factors also play a key role in the USDINR movement. Other factors, such as crude oil prices, trade deficit, inflation, etc., should also be considered along with USDX to analyze the movement of USDINR pair.

Where to get USDX charts?

You can get the USDX charts at in.investing.com

USDX charts on NYSE
I hope I have explained the dollar index in detail, however any comment, correction and feedback is welcome on the article.
submitted by bhaskarndas to u/bhaskarndas [link] [comments]

Dollar Index and its impact on USDINR movement

Dollar Index and its impact on USDINR movement

image courtesy : pixabay

Many people in India who are just beginning their career in Currency Derivatives frequently hear about Dollar index. The social media and other platforms full of questions like “What is the Dollar Index?” and how it will impact the Indian currency pairs, especially the USDINR pair. This article will try to explain the US Dollar Index or USDX and its impact on the Indian currency pair.

What is the Dollar Index?

To put in simple words, it is the value of USD relative to the basket of major currency pairs. The value of the USDX tells the strength of the dollar. The six major currency pairs forming the basket along with weight are :
  1. EUR (57.6% )
  2. CHF (Swiss Franc -3.6%)
  3. YEN (Japanese yen — 13.6%)
  4. CAD (Canadian Dollar -9.1%)
  5. GBP(11.9% )
  6. SEK (Swedish Krona — 4.2%)
The USDX was created after the Bretton Woods agreement was dissolved in 1973. The base value was taken as 100, and the value of USDX is relative to the base value. The USDX is similar to the other indexes such as stock indices such as S&P 500, Nifty 50, where the weighted average of most valuable stocks is taken to form the stock index.
For calculation purpose, the exchange rates of six major currencies are taken with their respective weights in the index.
Prior to the establishment of USDX, all the major participating countries settled their balances in USD. The USD could be converted to Gold at $ 35/ounce. This led to the overvaluation of USD and the linked gold prices resulting in the temporary suspension of the gold standard. The countries then were free to choose the exchange rate, which did not depend on the price of the Gold and several countries freely floated their exchange rates. This led to a search for another standard, and thus, the dollar index was born.

Highs and lows in dollar index value

In 1973 the value of dollar index was set to 100. It reached its peak in 1985 where its value was around 165. In 2008 it hit the low of 70. If the value of the dollar index is above 100, then the dollar has appreciated against the basket of currencies. In contrast, any value below 100 or equivalent to 100 means dollar has depreciated against the basket of currencies. It can also be referred that the dollar is weak below 100 and strong above 100. There are several factors which impact the dollar index. These factors include macroeconomics, deflation/inflation of dollar and other currencies in the basket, etc.

Is US Dollar Index Traded?

Yes Dollar Index popularly known as USDX or DXY is available for trading on the US and other overseas exchanges, but not in Indian bourses.

Is USDX available for Investment?

Yes, it is also available indirectly for Investment via ETF and mutual fund routes in the US markets. At the moment, the Indian market doesn’t have any such products for investment purpose.

How dollar index impacts USDINR?

Indeed weakening and strengthening of dollar impacts USDINR movement. If take into consideration businesses and services where we deal in dollars only then strengthening of dollar increases the Forex reserve value. In contrast, the weakening of the dollar globally reduces the income of all the export-oriented industries. The reverse is true for import oriented industries in the country.
If you are a trader, then falling and rising dollar index provides you with the opportunities to trade in the USDINR pairs in both ways. You can either short when the dollar is weakening or go long when the dollar is strengthening. You can also hedge your position in the wake of weakening dollar through options and future trades. Corporate Business houses hedge their risk by hedging against any Dollar appreciation/depreciation based on the index value.
But the movement of USDINR pair should not be solely analyzed merely on the movement of the dollar index, and other factors also play a key role in the USDINR movement. Other factors, such as crude oil prices, trade deficit, inflation, etc., should also be considered along with USDX to analyze the movement of USDINR pair.

Where to get USDX charts?

You can get the USDX charts at in.investing.com

USDX charts on NYSE
I hope I have explained the dollar index in detail, however any comment, correction and feedback is welcome on the article.
submitted by bhaskarndas to StockMarketIndia [link] [comments]

Ready to invest first time. Please correct my plan/strategy.

I have almost finished reading Millionaire Teacher, and am ready to invest. Will keep funds in for at least 10-15 years. I need to figure out my risk tolerance. I'm approaching age 40, thinking of keeping 35% bonds. At this point, I need to have my account on a brokerage ready ASAP as I learnt that it could take a few days to set up. For now, I am looking to purchase ETFs regularly. I'm looking at putting $100 per month. Hopefully cash flow will be disciplined enough to continue without breaks.
Currently, I have the following:

Please help me understand the following:
  1. How much cheaper is Norbert's Gambit than using a ForEx company to do a conversion from CAD to USD? I've never done either. I have done USD to CAD before, which basically takes 2-3 business days for the draft from the ForEx company to clear.
  2. I am considering either Questrade, TD Direct Investing or Scotia iTrade. Based on the reviews Questrade seems to be the best option. Which one would you recommended for a beginner like me? (Would be great feedback if you have used Questrade and TD/iTrade.)
  3. I mostly bank with Scotia. My investments will be 50K+ to start. Should I be considering iTrade over the other two for convenience? Or will the fees not make sense in my case?
  4. Is Norbert's Gambit possible to do with Scotiabank?
  5. Say I select Questrade, what is the most efficient (time/cost) process to move forward? Is the below correct?
    1. Transfer TFSA from Meridian to TD.
    2. Do Norbert's Gambit to convert to USD
    3. Transfer USD TFSA to Questrade.
    4. Transfer RRSP to TD
    5. Do Norbert's Gambit to covert to USD
    6. Transfer USD RRSP to Questrade.
  6. What steps above will incur least fees? I understand Questrade covers upto $150 transfer fee? But if I transfer my registered accounts to TD for Norbert's Gambit first, those fees won't be covered?
  7. Lastly, I'm not very knowledgable on RESPs. I understand gov't matches some part of the contribution? We have two kids, ages 10 and 8. No RESP yet. Can investments be made in RESPs? Any tips on this would be very much appreciated.
Thanks in advance!
submitted by LiveWithinYourMeans to PersonalFinanceCanada [link] [comments]

What's the best currency hedged ETF for VTI/SPY?

Which one has the best track record? My issue is buying something like VTI/SPY when the market gets close to bottom will also mean holding USD when they're at their most fear induced highs.. so as the market recovers, the USD will come back down erasing most of the gains relative to CAD. So I'd like to buy a currency hedged ETF in CAD instead to get the most out of the market recovery without any forex risk, and then when the USD settles sell it all and buy VTI or VUN depending on where the money is.
submitted by yerkind to PersonalFinanceCanada [link] [comments]

Norbit Gambit with large sum

I need to transfer about a little over 300K USD soon to Canada.
Currently I live in the US and still have my RBC account from when I lived in Canada. The US dollars are currently in a US bank account.
My plan is to open a RBC US cross border account (no annual fee for first year if I get their account/credit card bundle) and transfer it to my RBC account in Canada which has a US dollar savings account.
Then I'll open a RBC direct investing account where I'll perform the Norbit Gambit method using DLR.U/DLR ETF.
It seems pretty straightforward, but I was wondering if there are better options. eg. Using a forex trading service here in the US and using that to exchange it to CAD and then sending CAD over directly to my RBC account in Canada. I'm trying to avoid having to open a credit card I have no intention to use (though the card will be opened using my Canadian credit history so I'm not too concerned about the drop in credit score after closing the card later in the year).
I don't expect to be doing this kinda transfer again anytime soon. So any accounts I open will be closed fairly quickly.

Would be great to hear if anyone has tried the forex route or any other method I haven't mentioned. With the amount I'm transferring, any significant drop in exchange rates results in a few thousand dollars lost (hence why I can't just use normal transfer methods since RBC rates suck).
submitted by sh4d3 to PersonalFinanceCanada [link] [comments]

How to find Canadian ETFs for Questrade?

How do I find ETFs pegged to CAD on Questrade? I've got a good grasp of the basics of investing, I'm primarily interested in indexes, but want some tweaks to the standard CCP "total index" approach - low carbon and higher tech. It seems like every time I find an ETF following an index I'm interested in, it's only traded in USD on Questrade.
Some examples that I've tried to buy: SPYX, PZD, ETHO
Is it supposed to be this hard to buy funds in CAD? Am I just missing something incredibly obvious? I can find indices and the ETFs tracking them easily enough... but can't figure out how to find ETFs that I can buy in CAD. Is everyone just buying the USD funds and running Norbert's gambit/eating the forex fee/hedging their gains on currency speculation?
submitted by FierceCrayon to CanadianInvestor [link] [comments]

Best way to hold USD exposure?

Hi guys, I wanted to hear your thoughts on having dollar exposure and what sort of instruments are available for me to hold in CAD funds?

I have both non registered and RSP cash right now that I want to leave in cash but in USD. Is there a vehicle that I can hold without having to convert currencies? Basically I have a short CAD long USD view but I don't have any way to express that besides doing a norbert gambit which I am uncomfortable holding because of the time it takes to convert/journal. I don't trade currencies enough to justify the cost of a forex account. Is there a better option than buying DLR.to or perhaps some leveraged ETF's with low fees anyone knows about?

To reiterate I want cash/liquid exposure, not equities (I've only found articles suggesting to buy US equities for long term exposure). I want to speculate and have optionality of cash only.
submitted by oil_burner2 to CanadianInvestor [link] [comments]

Tax Related Questions

Hi again PFC. I'll soon be moving to Canada for the first time as a permanent resident and want to get my worldwide income (read: taxes) in order before I move, and have a few doubts.
FYI, as a newcomer, any income I have before landing is tax free.
  1. I have an Interactive Brokers account with USD holdings in ETF index funds. Should I withdraw that amount before coming to Canada and then transfer to a new account there? If not, after I land, will I be charged tax when I transfer over, likely to Questrade?
  2. I have a few fixed deposits (similar, if not the same as GIC's) in India where I won't need to pay any tax on upon maturity. Some mature in 1, 2, and 5 years).
a). Am I correct to think my initial capital won't be taxed later and only the interest on the FD's?
b). My dilemma is whether to break these now, lose the interest I could accrue, and convert the money now to CAD. In a couple of years the Indian rupee is likely to get worse against the CAD so I'd lose out on forex conversion and then tax. Would that be more or less than tax I may have to pay?
  1. I'll be selling some property and/or getting the money I invested (+ interest) back, hopefully soon. Do I need to pay tax on property sales in a foreign country, even if I purchased before I moved to Canada?
If anyone has ideas or sources on how to figure out / calculate the best options, I'd be indebted.
Thanks.
submitted by AUserName01 to PersonalFinanceCanada [link] [comments]

My experience with Norbit's Gambit [google sheets link included]

Just want to share my experience doing Norbit's Gambit, for anyone that may want to learn on my experience, or tell me all the ways in which I am wrong.
I've posted a question earlier, asking how to make sure the market didn't swing in the wrong direction. And yes, I understand it's called a "gambit" for a reason.
=== TL;DR === - Wanted to save $65 on currency conversion while buying CAD $3,500 worth of US stock - Overestimated forex fee, underestimated NG cost - Murphy happened... - Lost potential gains of CAD $185.80 while waiting - Is the gambit ever worth it?
=== The goal === - On August 25th, use about CAD $3,500 to buy some US Netflix (NFLX) shares
=== The method === - Buy DLR in CAD - Call brokerage to journal over to US side - Sell DLR.U in USD - Buy NFLX with USD
In a lot of my research, I've been told the "fee" when going through the brokerage (Questrade in my case) is 2%. That's not too accurate.
=== The brokerage Forex rate/fee === So I assumed 2% of $3,500 would be $70.
However it's really an addition of 199 basis points to the exchange rate. I believe they use the closing exchange rate on the date of the transaction.
So if the exchange was 1.2500, it's 1.2699, and $CAD 1000 nets $USD 787.46 ($USD 12.54 short of ideal $USD 800). If we convert 12.54 to CAD, it's $CAD 15.68 or 1.568% on the original $CAD 1000.
But if the exchange is 1.2200, it's 1.2399, and $CAD 1000 nets $USD 806.51 ($USD 13.16 short of ideal $USD 819.67). If we convert 13.16 to CAD, it's $CAD 16.06 of 1.606% of the original $CAD 1000
The "conversion fee" is dependent on the exchange rate, but I can't figure out a quick direct way to calculate what the "fee" would be in source currency %. The closest guesstimate is to divide the basis points by the current exchange rate, as below:
On August 25th, the exchange rate was 1.2483. So the above guesstimate for the Forex "fee" would be $55.80. Or more accurately $54.91, close enough. Still, that's 21.5% lower than the broad *$70** estimate earlier.*
=== The NG effective fee === Here once again, the common consensus is that the NG's fee is just a cost of buying and selling an ETF. So, with QT's free ETF purchases, the guesstimate is just about $5 for the selling commission.
When I bought DLR ETF on August 25th, I got it for CAD $12.42 per share (that's not the day's close price, but what I actually paid). the US side of DLR.U is always US $9.93. The gives the DLR Exchange Rate of 1.2508... already different from the ideal 1.2483 (I suppose that's how the ETF makes money)
So, it would appear the cost/fee of NG is just CAD $0.99 + US $5.94 (CAD $8.40)... but not quite. Let's look as the actual US dollar amounts. Since we can only buy whole shares of DLR + ECN fee, from this point I am converting CAD $3,502.44 + $0.99 = $3,503.43
The difference between the ideal US $amount and what I am left with is the "fee" for doing NG. US $12.24, or CAD $15.28. This sets the NG's Effective Exchange Rate as 1.2538 or a "NG's fee" of 0.44%. Please note that this rate/fee is *based on the converted amount*: the more you convert, the less/cheaper it is.
So comparing the actual cost of NG vs QT's auto conversion and the guesstimates is quite different - Actual $15.28 vs $54.91 ($39.63 spread) - Guesstimate $5 vs $70 ($65 spread)
=== The Time factor === Now that I have US $2,794.32, let's buy some NFLX. The date now is Sept 5th (yes, the NG completed earlier, but I am human... also QT didn't call me when the journaling was completed so I got sidetracked).
Before doing the NG, I calculated that NFLX dropped about 2.02% in 10 days. It could also go up by same amount. That 2.02% rise on CAD $3,500 value would be a gain of $70.7... comparable to $65 guesstimate loss of doing currency auto-conversion through QT (QTAC). So in my analysis, at worth case it would be a wash, in best case I save some money on NG. ... We already know now that the actual cost of QTAC is much less ....
This was the end result of my NG: spent CAD $3,503.43 and 11 days later I have a US stock+cash Portfolio of value US $2,789.37
But considering the increase in NFLX stock over those 11 days, what if I would have just went with Questrade's Auto-conversion (QTAC) route?
In 11 days, the value of NFLX is @178.79 - Current value of 16 NFLX shares = US $2,860.64 - Plus cash US $77.57 for a Total Portfolio Value of US $2,938.21
If, on August 25th, I would have auto converted currency with QT and bought NFLX, I would have a portfolio value of US $2,938.21 on September 5th.
Instead, starting the Norbit's Gambit on August 25th, I bought NFLX on Sept 5th and have a portfolio value of US $2,789.37
Instead of saving a guesstimate of CAD $65, I have lost potential gains of US $148.84 or CAD $185.80
=== Murphy... or Loonie... whatever === In all of above, I tried to keep the currency fluctuations isolated. So apart from initial conversion on August 25th, all my future (September 5th) portfolio values were in USD. But as Murphy would have it, the BoC rate announcement made the loonie stronger in between my NG.
Based on above, doing QT auto-conversion - On August 25th, nets US $2,762.52 - On September 5th, nets US $2,817.62 I would have got US $55.10 more just by doing the QTAC later.
If I would have bought NFLX on September 5th after doing QTAC - 15 whole shares @178.79 + $4.95 comm leaves me with US $130.82 in cash - Total NFLX + Cash portfolio value of US $2,812.67
That's still US $23.30 more than doing the NG, although still less than just buying NFLX outright on August 25th and letting it grow.
=== Final conclusion === Smaller amount (CAD $3,500) for NG for a stock purchase that could/did swing 6% was not worth it. Loonie getting stronger also made the whole exercise fruitless, but even eliminating the currency fluctuation, the growth of the stock outperformed the savings of NG.
Playing with my numbers, assuming the currency fluctuation is fixed, for CAD $3,500, doing Norbit's Gambit vs Questrade's Auto-Conversion is breaking even when the stock appreciation is no more than 1.18% during the time it takes to complete NG (11 days in my case). Even if you are more punctual and can complete it in 5 days, you still need to make sure the stock doesn't appreciate more than 1.18% in 5 days.
By comparison, if converting CAD $10,000, it's break even if stock rises 1.27% during that time. When doing CAD $50,000 then 1.31%
Hmm.... so even at high amounts of CAD $50,000 the tolerance to stock fluctuation is pretty low. So is it worth it?
Ultimately I've:
For anyone that cares, here is public Google Sheets docs to verify my math (File -> Make a copy, in order to edit values) https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/12nH8Q_0cKFtFTW_yomASHtpLXN6oYuTgkXeTNAMkQGY/edit?usp=sharing
submitted by hydraSlav to PersonalFinanceCanada [link] [comments]

Invest in Canada or USA currently?

Hi,
I'm Canadian but I'm currently working in the states. I'm starting to have some savings (in USD) and wondering if I should be putting them in the Canadian or American market. My thinking is that CAD is cheap right now, so Canada would be better value? Is this even a sensible way to think about things? I'm not all that sophisticated as an investor...I tend to buy pure stocks in big risk averse companies like apple and msft and shell, etc. I'm open to funds and ETFs and all that, but just wondering if forex rates are a valid factor to consider. Like is there any advantage in transferring my USD to CAD and invest in the Canadian market, due to favourable exchange rates atm?
Thanks
submitted by beatlemaniac007 to investing [link] [comments]

Creating long CAD:USD exposure in portfolio

I was hoping somebody could help me out. I am a Canadian, with almost all my assets in Canadian Dollars. I'd like to diversify my holdings outside of Canada but given the current state of our economy and commodity prices which are depressing our currency I am bullish the CadUSD exchange in the long term.
I am looking to add some long exposure to the CadUSD exchange rate in my portfolio and wondering what the most cost effective way to gain this exposure over a long term investment horizon is.
It seems easy to short the CadUSD exchange rate by buying unhedged ETFs tracking underlying US equities or bonds, or by simply converting my cash to USDs and investing directly in US exchanges. It is also easy to neutralize CadUSD exposure by buying the many currency hedged ETFs listed on Canadian exchanges. I can't seem to find an easy or obvious way to create an underlying long CadUSD exposure when building my portfolio out.
I suppose I could go out and by ETFs that track Forex rates but I'd rather have that exposure imbedded in my portfolio rather than tying up capital to speculate on currency or buying those ETFs on margin in addition to say a currency hedged ETF tracking international equities or bonds.
Anyone have any creative ways I can gain this exposure or recommendations?
Thanks!
submitted by Pstrad to investing [link] [comments]

Personal Finance for Newcomers

We, a family of 3 with a small daughter, are landing in Canada as immigrant newcomers next month, bringing about 25K CAD with us. We also have about 60K CAD as assets in homeland that we are not immediately bringing with us. After some research, here is what we planned to do. I need suggestions from the generous redditors of this forum, if our plans are okay and if we are missing something.
Bank accounts
I'm appalled by the low interest rates for savings accounts and the tax on interest income. So we'll right away open two TFSAs along with our checking accounts, for me and my spouse and deposit 5K each. The idea is to invest these in ETFs or Stocks. I've shortlisted to open 1 account each in both Questrade and Virtual Traders.
Question: If we need 1 USD and 1 CAD TFSA, which amongst Questrade and VT would have what? Questrade allows journaling Norberts Gambit, so do we need both CAD and USD in the same broker to do a Norberts? We are planning to invest only in non-dividend paying USD stocks and ETFs in the USD TFSA.
For the regular checking accounts, we'll probably go with TD or Tangerine. TD Newcomer packages provides 6 months of no fee and also a credit card, and a USD account, so looks attractive. After 4-5 months, we can of course open a Tangerine too. BTW, does anyone know which bank offers nice benefits for newcomers? Also, which credit card is good for mainly grocery purchases and eating out? How many days does it take to get a credit card, once I have a SIN? We plan to have one checking account and two credit cards, is it possible?
RESP
It is possible for us to open a RESP immediately right? We'll be in SK, so I guess there is also a SK education grant. The plan is to open a RESP and deposit 2.5K immediately. Question - which SK institution offers online RESP contribution with no fee?
So that leaves us with 12.5K in Cash, of which 6K will go to the TD account towards checking minimum balance (5k) and the rest 6.5k is for taking a rental house and other expenses. I'm also bringing a forex card loaded with 1k which would also be used, but since it won't help us build a credit limit, we don't want to load more into it.
We want to buy a used car, say a month later, costing about 3K. Will I be able to use my credit card for that, considering we just got it a month ago? A secured one will help? If we can't use CC, then I've to bring more cash from home.
USD vs CAD
Do we need to bring a part of this 25K CAD in USD, say 5K USD to go into the USD TFSA? Or can we just bring CAD and avoid fx conversion charges/commissions doing Norberts Gambit after a TFSA CAD is opened in Questrade? We are a bit confused. To make matters worse, CAD is appreciating against greenback and I guess any USD holdings will lose some money in the near future?
Homeland Assets
I read that we've to maintain a record of fair market values of homeland properties and assets on the landing date, and this would be the adjusted cost base to calculates gains, on future sales. So, we will have this record.
Finally, as far personal finances are concerned, are we really missing something in this big move of ours? :-)
submitted by aspironet1 to PersonalFinanceCanada [link] [comments]

Can we talk VTI vs. VUN?

I'm soon going to have my TFSA room full, which means I'll be getting to my RRSP (no company match, so it's been lower priority for me), and I reckon I should be putting American stocks in there since I'm focusing heavily on Canadian stocks in my TFSA. For a total market ETF i'm looking at VTI and VUN. They're basically the same thing, except VTI is traded on the NYSE and VUN is traded on the TSX.
VUN has a slightly higher MER, but since it's traded in Canadian dollars, you don't have to pay any currency exchange fees. This would suggest to me that if you're holding long VTI might be preferable, but if you're looking shorter, VUN might be better? Does that make sense?
Beyond that, is choosing between the two simply a bit of a FOREX question, where you're trying to predict if the CAD will be stronger or weaker with respect to the USD by the time you sell?
Thx!
submitted by gart888 to PersonalFinanceCanada [link] [comments]

All income in USD: Help with International Equity in TFSA

I thought I had all questions answered after my last post outlining my portfolio structure, but an issue came to light after reviewing my International Equities decisions. Apologies if this has been answered before, I wasn't able to find a definitive answer after quite a few hours of searching PFC for posts addressing this.
I expect to be in a higher tax bracket at retirement than now, therefore I am aiming to max out my TFSA first before looking at RRSPs and taxable accounts. I still have a long way to go before doing that, which means I have to put International Equity ETFs in my TFSA.
Given that all my income is in USD, I am trying to decide which of these options maximizes effective returns:
  1. Convert USD to CAD using Norbert's Gambit, and buy XEF & XEC. This creates losses due to the Forex, and respective Foreign Withholding Taxes (FWT) of 0.26% and 0.63% according to the White Paper by PWL Capital.
  2. Use USD directly to buy VEA and IEMG (US traded ETFs), with respective FWT of 0.59% and 0.63%.
  3. A hybrid of options 1 & 2: Buy XEF using Norbert's Gambit, buy IEMG using USD, thereby avoiding Forex fees on IEMG.
Trying to work out the numbers in Excel, I found that Option 3 is the best, but it would be great if someone with more experience could confirm I'm not missing anything.
Notes:
submitted by PositivelyNotARobot to PersonalFinanceCanada [link] [comments]

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